Sonnet 55 analysis essay

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Please forward this error screen to 198. In this Daydream, we find our Heaven. Essay on Shakespeare’s Sonnet 15: Written in the Stars is a close reading of Shakespeare’s fifteenth sonnet 55 analysis essay and the themes and messages contained therein.

Written in the Stars is a close reading of Shakespeare’s fifteenth sonnet and the themes and messages contained therein. 1650 words, or exactly four pages, double spaced. American, but tends to spell things the British way–the correct way, thanks. Many of Shakespeare’s sonnets have a common theme, especially those which are dedicated to the young man. Several have the message that the speaker will preserve the youth’s youthful spirit and beauty forever in verse, even after time has taken the youth’s beauty from him and turned him into an elderly man, wrinkled and bent over. Each sonnet uses a different theme to convey this message, though and Sonnet 15 is no different from the others in this respect. This particular sonnet deals with ideas that crop up in some of Shakespeare’s plays as well in addition to his sonnets: fate, destiny, and astrological pre-determination of the future.

The speaker opens the sonnet with some thoughts on the shortness of life. Our speaker revisits this idea later on in the sonnet in lines seven and eight. Line seven builds to the pinnacle of life, that point when a person is at their absolute prime and they are the best examples of human life before declining into old age. Line eight bears the double meaning of not only being the forgetfulness of elderly people, but also of characterizing those who can’t help but relive their glory days every chance they get. Lines nine through twelve become more personal for our speaker.

In this final quatrain, our speaker comments on how his reflection upon the shortness of youth has conjured up the image of the fair youth to whom many of Shakespeare’s sonnets are dedicated to. The thoughts that our speaker has had in regards to the decay of youth brings into focus the harsh reality that some day, too, the fair youth will lose his beauty. These two lines make it clear that our speaker has a great disdain for the fair youth’s eventual fall from beauty. On the opposite side of the coin however, night is cold and dark, full of unknown things which go bump. There are few who would prefer to be out at night over daytime.

Our speaker also realizes that aging is inevitable. It is a common belief that the future can be told with the stars and that the position of the stars and planets at the time of a birth will affect how the child will behave. That is to say, nobody has control over their lives, each person on Earth is merely playing a role that has been laid out for them as an actor reads his lines and finds his marks upon the stage. In Sonnet 15, it is the stars who give humans their stage directions. The astrological point of view comes resurfaces later in the sonnet in line twelve.

In this final quatrain, each person on Earth is merely playing a role that has been laid out for them as an actor reads his lines and finds his marks upon the stage. I authorize The Paper Store Enterprises, this section does not apply to you! Shakespeare dedicated a great many of his sonnets to a fair, all papers are guaranteed to reasonably match their catalog descriptions and are sold “as is” without any option for refund or credit. This can’t be undone — so it is even more fitting that Shakespeare writes about fate and the human inability to change their destinies while using such a rigid writing format.

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